Serving the betterment of Society! — Inspiration HERE (Repost)

This post ties in well with the theme for this week “Patience

Understanding the difference between a want and a need will make it easier to decide what things are worth chasing vs waiting for in life.

If the mind and mouth belong to the body, what belongs to the soul? We speak of infinite tales of mankind and its growth. We speak boldly of integrity and justice. We assert our views and want to see developments likewise. Here is the problem, All of these end up becoming our wants and not […]

Serving the betterment of Society! — Inspiration HERE

Beatus Manifestationes,
Nomadic Free Spirit

IG vs DG

Is wanting everything instantly beneficial to you? Chances are if you said yes, you are setting yourself for failure. The world bombards you with messages that promote instant desires regularly. For instance, you’ll see a before and after photo of someone who lost weight or “the rags to riches” story. People focus so much on the finished product that they forget the journey that led up to that point. For those who are not familiar with the terms, I’ll go into detail.

Instant gratification is wanting a successful outcome as quickly as possible. For example (and I’m sure we’re all guilty of this):

  • scrolling through social media to see the likes on posts
  • getting junk food when you know you’ll regret it later.

These activities are desirable because dopamine is released, which gives you a temporary burst of happiness. When the “high” wears off, you go back to feeling normal again. To maintain this feeling, you keep repeating the cycle. You may not think it’s detrimental to indulge but think about those resolutions you made; what’s the progress? It’s just keeping you in the short term mindset with no form of security to prepare for later months.

Delayed gratification, on the other hand, is putting in the effort now so you can obtain a successful outcome in the future. Examples are:

  • completing a course or degree
  • noticing progress after maintaining a workout regiment

It requires effort and sacrifice to attain your goals. It may be hard at times when you experience “failure” but not giving up forces your mind to adapt to counteract the diversions.

A well-known study of instant vs delayed gratification is the Stanford Marshmallow Experiment. The study was conducted in 1972 by psychologist Walter Mischel. Children were given a marshmallow (or preferred treat) and told they could eat the marshmallow now (instant gratification) or wait fifteen minutes to get another marshmallow (delayed gratification). Follow up studies showed that the children who practised delayed gratification obtained better life outcomes than those who opted to eat the marshmallow.

So I ask the question again; Is wanting everything instantly beneficial to you? Take some time to think about the long term effects before indulging in that guilty pleasure.

Beatus Manifestationes,
Nomadic Free Spirit